Making Jesus Come Alive (Behold the King of Glory Review and Giveaway)

Behold

I received a copy of the book Behold the King of Glory from Family Christian in exchange for a review. However, the opinions in this post are entirely my own.

My husband picked up the book I was reading the other day and gave me a funny look. “Behold the King of Glory: A Narrative of the Life, Death, and Resurrection of Jesus Christ? Don’t we already have that? Isn’t it called the Bible?”

In a way, my husband is right. There’s no better source for the facts of Jesus’ life, death and resurrection than the Bible. The Bible stands on its own in presenting the saving story of Jesus.

However, I grew up in the church. I have 40 years of Easter, Christmas and Bible verses under my belt. And sometimes, I need to be reminded of how amazing the story of God’s love truly is. I need a different perspective. I need something to bring my attention back to the miracle of the resurrection.

And that’s what Behold the King of Glory: A Narrative of the Life, Death, and Resurrection of Jesus Christ does. It takes the biblical accounts of Jesus’ life from his first miracle to his resurrection and puts them in a chronological, narrative form. It draws Jesus as the true-life person that He was.

Author Russ Ramsey bring Jesus to life in his writing by using all the gospel accounts and weaving them into one cohesive picture of Jesus, the man, and Jesus as God. His account of Jesus calling his disciples gave me goosebumps because I could see the picture of it in my head. Ramsey takes verses that I’ve been hearing and reading my whole life and offers a fresh perspective on them.

The book is broken down into 40 short chapters, which makes it perfect as a family devotional during the Lent season. Even if you don’t celebrate Lent, I’d encourage you to check it out to read in the 40 days before Easter. It will bring Jesus to life for your family, especially if you have older kids who have grown up in the church.

Making Jesus come alive for our kids is one of the most important things we can do for them. It can be easy for our kids to just file the biblical accounts of Jesus’ life away as one more thing they’ve heard all their lives. Anything we can do to bring Him to life for them, is something we should pursue. Sometimes just hearing the biblical accounts written in a more modern, more chronological way can do that for our kids.

If you have kids who are 10 or older and you’re looking for a different kind of family devotional, be sure to check out Behold the King of Glory: A Narrative of the Life, Death, and Resurrection of Jesus Christ. To make that a little easier, Family Christian has given me a $10 certificate to give away. Check it out and enter to win below.

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When You Miss Easter

Mercies

Easter kind of snuck up on me this year. My daughter’s birthday was on Good Friday. I’ve been battling an infection for the past two weeks, and I’ve been swamped with work. I’ve burned the candle at both ends, and Easter just appeared as an afterthought.

We didn’t dye Easter eggs. We didn’t read the resurrection story together. We didn’t even put Easter decorations out. My girls were lucky to find things in their Easter basket.

As I stood in church yesterday morning, I realized we had spent almost no time at all focused on this most important of holidays. There had been no teachable moments with my kids. There had been little reflection on the importance of the day. The day was simply here.

And I felt guilty. I felt as if this year I had failed as a follower of Christ and as parent. But as I stood there singing about Jesus’ resurrection, I remembered the words of Lamentations 3:22-23: “Because of the Lord’s great love we are not consumed, for his compassions never fail. They are new every morning; great is your faithfulness.” The King James Version says God’s mercies are new every morning.

You see, Jesus’ resurrection isn’t about a single day — although it is important that we celebrate that day. His resurrection is about eternity. His resurrection is about bridging the gap between us and God every day. His mercies are new every morning. They are available to us every day — not just on Easter.

So while the Easter holiday is nice, it’s not enough to simply focus on the resurrection once a year. Jesus’ resurrection is what makes His death important. He defeated death and made a way for us to draw near to God.  And that’s something to celebrate year-round, not just one day a year.

If Easter snuck up on you like it did on me, if you missed those teachable moments with your kids, if you got to Easter morning and realized you had missed a multitude of opportunities to focus on the resurrection, remember this: God’s mercies are new every morning, and the resurrection means as much today as it did yesterday.

Easter Reminders: The Cross and the Stone

cross

I wrote this post a couple of years ago, but its message resonates today. Always remember that the cross and the stone must go together because one without the other means very little.

A cross and a stone. Those are the images of Easter. One represents death. The other life. Without one, there is no need for the other.

The cross

Over the years, the cross has lost it’s gruesomeness. We’ve prettied it up. We wear the reminder around our necks, we hang it on our walls. When we look at it, we don’t see what the Jews of Jesus day saw. We don’t see a symbol of death and oppression. We see only a symbol of hope. We see a symbol of sacrifice.

Yet, for centuries, the cross was a tool of oppression. The Jewish people did not use crucifixion as a form of punishment. It was reserved for the Roman government. And you didn’t have to commit a horrific crime to find yourself hanging from one. You could steal something or speak out against the government. The cross wasn’t just a tool of execution. It was a public deterrent to dissent.

And that’s where Jesus died — on a human government’s tool to suppress revolt. He died on a hill in full view of everyone, his crime posted on a sign above His head. At any time, Jesus could have climbed off the cross. He could have taken over, sent everyone fleeing in the face of His awesome power. But He didn’t. He stayed on that cross and died, bearing the weight of the sin of the world. All so we could be free — not from an oppressive government, but from the separation from God. And in that moment, the cross became a symbol not of death and oppression, but a symbol of love.

The stone

It was big. It was heavy. It was unmoveable by one person. The stone that covered the entrance to the tomb was an obstacle to the living. Yet, even the heavy stone could not keep Jesus in the grave.

When the women arrived at the tomb on Sunday morning, that stone, that keeper of death, was rolled away. The tomb was empty. And it would stay that way. This was no mistake. No one had taken Jesus’ body. He had been dead for three days and then came back to life.

Without the stone, there is no redemptive power in the cross. Without the stone, Jesus would just be another man who claimed to be God. It is only because of the stone that the words of John 3:16 mean anything. “For God so loved the world that he gave his one and only Son, that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life.” Only a living God can promise eternal life. Jesus’ death means nothing without His resurrection.

The cross is useless without the stone.

Create reminders

As Easter approaches, as we take our kids to Good Friday and Easter services, we need to help them understand that the importance of Easter lies not just in the cross but in the stone as well. Create a reminder of the importance that the tomb was empty.

Sometime this weekend, give your kids a cross made of twigs and a rock from the yard. Explain that they are reminders of the two events that make Easter so important. Jesus died on the cross as a sacrifice for our sins. It represents the fact that Jesus loves us and wants us to have a relationship with Him. Jesus rose from the grave three days later. The stone represents the amazing power of a living God. It reminds us that Jesus is who He said He is, and He holds power even over death.

The cross and the stone. Two important reminders of what Easter means to us.

 

What Makes Good Friday Good?

It’s Good Friday. I’ve always thought that was an interesting name for the day we remember the death of our Savior. To most people death means the end of something — the end of a life, the end of a dream. Death and good usually aren’t placed in the same sentence.

Yet, Good Friday is just that — good. It’s a day to reflect, a day to remember all that Jesus has done for us, starting with His death on a cross. Because when Jesus died, the curtain in the temple ripped in half — from the top down. Jesus’ death ripped away the barrier separating us from God. Forever. While His death brought sadness to those who knew Him, to those who didn’t understand what would happen on Sunday, His death brought eternal joy for the rest of us.

Good Friday is good because it meant that nothing — nothing — would ever keep us separated from God again. Jesus took all of the sin that kept us from God upon Himself. And then He died. Not because He had done anything wrong, but because He loves us — you and me. He chose to stay on that cross because He loves me, because the only way to defeat sin was to die. He chose to stay on that cross because He didn’t want me to spend eternity separated from God. Good Friday is good because it’s the biggest show of love from anyone ever.

Good Friday is good because it means nothing I do, nothing I say can ever undo the sacrifice that Jesus made. No matter how deep the pit I’m in, no matter how horrible the thing I’ve done, Jesus’ sacrifice covers it all. He died so that I don’t have to walk alone. God can be there with me because my sin is covered in Jesus’ blood. “In him we have redemption through his blood, the forgiveness of sins, in accordance with the riches of God’s grace” (Ephesians 1:7).

Good Friday might seem like a strange name for the day we remember Jesus’ death, but it truly is a good day. Because despite the sadness that goes along with Jesus’ death, joy is coming on Sunday. Jesus didn’t stay dead. He rose again. He made a sacrifice, and then He conquered death. On Sunday, we’ll celebrate because Jesus is alive.

But today, let’s focus our hearts and minds on the goodness of this day. Let’s help our kids understand what’s good about this day. Let’s reflect on just what it is that makes Good Friday so good.

5 Ways to Get Your Kids Talking About Easter

Last week, we went on our annual pilgrimage for Easter dresses. My older daughter picked out her first dress from the juniors department. My younger daughter got one that sparkles from head to toe. It’s one of the few times of the year that I can get both of them in a dress.

We all have traditions that go with Easter — from dress shopping to having ham for Easter dinner — yet just like Christmas we can get caught up in the traditions and miss the importance of the day. We can assume our kids know the events of Easter and why they’re important, so we skip over the important conversations.

We don’t want our kids to miss Easter. We don’t want them to go through this holy season without understanding how Easter sets Jesus apart from every other person who walked the earth. Check out these easy ways to get your kids talking about Easter.

1. Use Resurrection Eggs. My kids still love Resurrection Eggs. These plastic eggs each contain an item that tells the story of Easter. When my girls were little, I used to tell them the story. Now, they tell me about the events of Easter. It’s a great way to retell the events of Easter in an engaging manner that gets your kids talking.

2.Read Resurrection iWitness. This is a great book along the lines of the Pirateology books. With interactive pages and engaging writing, this book dissects some of the “alternate theories” about the resurrection and explains why the resurrection is the best answer for the question “What happened to Jesus’ body.” It’s apologetics for kids presented in a way that entertains and informs.

3. Make resurrection rolls. These rolls are hollow in the middle, so when you open them up it looks like an empty tomb. This is a great way to get conversation started around the Easter dinner table. You can find the recipe here.

4. Have a scripture egg hunt. Along with candy, put scripture verses that pertain to Easter in your plastic eggs. Hide the eggs and let your kids hunt them. At the end of the hunt, have everyone read their scripture verses and talk about what they mean.

5. Make a cross. Gather enough twigs for each person in your family to make a cross. Place two twigs in the shape of a cross. Wrap twine around the center of the two twigs to hold them together. Place or hang the crosses in each person’s room so they have a daily reminder of the sacrifice Jesus made for them. While you’re making the crosses, talk about the events of Easter.

Getting your kids talking about Easter can be as easy as asking them a thought-provoking question about how they would have felt going to the tomb or what they thought the angel looked like if the Roman soldiers were cowering in fear. It’s not important how we get our kids talking about the events of that weekend long ago. It’s simply important that we get them talking about it.

 

Did Jesus Really Rise From the Dead?

Although there’s nearly a foot of snow on the ground here, it really is Easter week. Next Sunday, we’ll celebrate the greatest miracle of all — the resurrection of Jesus. Without the resurrection, there is no salvation. Without the resurrection, Jesus was just another guy who claimed to be God. Without the resurrection, we remain lost and separated from God.

Yet the resurrection is the most questioned piece of the redemption story. It is the one thing that doubters have tried to poke holes in throughout history. His disciples stole the body. It was a mass hallucination. The women went to the wrong tomb. When these theories are examined in the light of the historical record, though, they don’t hold up.

One of the most common arguments against the resurrection is that Jesus’ disciples stole his body so that it would appear He had risen again after three days. Yet, this feat would have been impossible to carry out. Jesus’ tomb was covered with a huge boulder that would have been extremely difficult to move. On top of that, the tomb was guarded by Roman soldiers. Now, Roman soldiers weren’t people you wanted to mess with. They were the most highly trained soldiers of their day. And the disciples were mostly fishermen. The thought that these untrained men could take out the Roman soldiers guarding the tomb is laughable.

The idea that Jesus’ resurrection was a mass hallucination doesn’t hold water either. Hallucinations aren’t mass events. If you hallucinate, it’s highly unlikely you’re going to have the same hallucination as the person next to you. And Jesus appeared to hundreds of people over a period of 40 days. Hallucinations don’t usually last that long.

The last idea that the women went to the wrong tomb doesn’t hold water either. These women had given up a lot to follow Jesus. They were headed to the tomb to perform a final act of service to Him. Even in their grief, they would have known which tomb to go to. If you were going to the funeral of a loved one, wouldn’t you get directions to the cemetery if you didn’t know where it was?

The only logical explanation for what happened to Jesus’ body after He died is the one given in the Bible: “He is not here; he has risen, just as he said.” (Matthew 28:6) As we celebrate Jesus’ resurrection this Sunday, be ready to answer your kids’ questions about the event. Because it’s not just a story; it’s not just a myth. Jesus’ resurrection is true, and it is the lynchpin of our salvation.

First Friday: The Broken Cross

Today is Good Friday. The day that we remember the sacrifice that Jesus made for us. And today, I get to introduce you to my friend Sara Cormany. Sara is a gifted writer whose writing touches my heart every time I read it. She has graciously agreed to fill this space on the first Friday of every month. I know you’ll enjoy hearing from her as much as I do. Today, enjoy being reminded that because of the cross, Jesus can pick up our broken pieces.

Sleepily, I padded into the kitchen this morning.  Lifted the baby into her highchair.  And threw some dried cereal in her general direction, secretly hoping it would give me a moment to collect myself.

I would like to say that moment involved perusing something amusing on the internet.  Or intensely conversing on the phone with a dear friend.  In truth, I would like that moment to involve anything other than what it actually did involve:

Blank staring.  A dirty kitchen sink.  And one exhausted woman.

But in an effort to be completely authentic,  I will confirm that I was, indeed, emptily gawking at said sink when it happened.  An enormous crash.  Followed by a random object hitting me squarely in the back of the head.

I turned to see my son standing on a chair looking sheepish.  My daughter, in her high chair holding decorative berries in her hand.  And my resin cross that normally rested on our buffet, in pieces on the floor.

My reaction was less than gracious.  I most likely shouted “Noooooo!!!”  “Aaccckk!!!” or “What in the world?”  Something not terribly brilliant but definitely too dramatic for the demise of a $10  cross from Hobby Lobby.

As I huffed and puffed while looking for a lone candle that had also vanished, I caught something out of the corner of my eye:

It was my son.  Who had since climbed down from the chair.  And was now systematically gathering the pieces of the cross.

I stopped for a moment and just watched him. He lovingly picked them up.  Made a pile.  And began attempting to put the pieces back together.

I sat down beside him and said, “What are you doing, buddy?”

Focused on the task at hand, he kept working but managed to say quietly, “Jesus died on the cross for me.”

Suddenly, all the frustration over the mess melted away.  I took his sweet face in my hands.  And spoke words that were really meant for me. “You’re right, Drew.  And just like you, He takes all our broken pieces and puts them back together to make something beautiful.”

A few hours later, I took the time to painstakingly put the cross back together.  Piece by piece.  Super-gluing my thumb and forefinger together several times.

But I even didn’t mind that so much.

You see, my broken cross was more beautiful than it had ever been before. 

Now, when I look at it, I won’t just see a cheap resin cross from Hobby Lobby.  I will, in fact, see something far more precious.  Something that will keep me fixed on a simple truth that often I miss in my journey with Jesus.

That something echoes back to me in my son’s simple utterance, “Jesus died on the cross for me.”

Over and over again, I hear it.  It floods my mind with its simplicity.  And takes my breath away at its sufficiency.

But its power screams to me as I say the words out loud…

The cross really is enough.

In our humanness, we will try to obsess about brokenness just as I did the mess.  Or we will focus on fixing what is broken, as my son did with the cross.  We will attempt to do this with friends, with spouses, with children and even with ourselves.

But the cross is enough. 

Lay friends before its shadow.  Or spouses.  Or children.

Or even yourself.

It is as Isaiah reminds us, “He was beaten so we could be whole.”

And it is why on my buffet, you will find a broken cross.

Chipped.  Slightly crooked.  And beautifully missing a tiny piece in the center.

Couched by the offending decorative berries.  Near a picture of the little hands that tried so earnestly to put it back together.  And placed visibly for all to see.

Our daily reminder that Jesus picks up our broken pieces.  Puts them lovingly back together.   And makes us perfectly whole.

Sara Cormany is mommy to six-year-old Grace, four-year-old Drew and one-year-old Sophie.  When she is not wiping noses, changing diapers or chasing after runaway candles, she is a sometimes writer and a sometimes teacher to teenagers.  But her most cherished role is that of one who is perfectly held by Jesus. She loves watching Him take the broken, the messy and the seemingly mundane of her everyday and turn it into something beautiful. 

Linking up today with Beholding Glory.

Easter Reminders

A cross and a stone. Those are the images of Easter. One represents death. The other life. Without one, there is no need for the other.

The cross

Over the years, the cross has lost it’s gruesomeness. We’ve prettied it up. We wear the reminder around our necks, we hang it on our walls. When we look at it, we don’t see what the Jews of Jesus day saw. We don’t see a symbol of death and oppression. We see only a symbol of hope. We see a symbol of sacrifice.

Yet, for centuries, the cross was a tool of oppression. The Jewish people did not use crucifixion as a form of punishment. It was reserved for the Roman government. And you didn’t have to commit a horrific crime to find yourself hanging from one. You could steal something or speak out against the government. The cross wasn’t just a tool of execution. It was a public deterrent to dissent.

And that’s where Jesus died — on a human government’s tool to suppress revolt. He died on a hill in full view of everyone, his crime posted on a sign above His head. At any time, Jesus could have climbed off the cross. He could have taken over, sent everyone fleeing in the face of His awesome power. But He didn’t. He stayed on that cross and died, bearing the weight of the sin of the world. All so we could be free — not from an oppressive government, but from the separation from God. And in that moment, the cross became a symbol not of death and oppression, but a symbol of love.

The stone

It was big. It was heavy. It was unmoveable by one person. The stone that covered the entrance to the tomb was an obstacle to the living. Yet, even the heavy stone could not keep Jesus in the grave.

When the women arrived at the tomb on Sunday morning, that stone, that keeper of death, was rolled away. The tomb was empty. And it would stay that way. This was no mistake. No one had taken Jesus’ body. He had been dead for three days and then came back to life.

Without the stone, there is no redemptive power in the cross. Without the stone, Jesus would just be another man who claimed to be God. It is only because of the stone that the words of John 3:16 mean anything. “For God so loved the world that he gave his one and only Son, that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life.” Only a living God can promise eternal life. Jesus’ death means nothing without His resurrection.

The cross is useless without the stone.

Create reminders

As Easter approaches, as we take our kids to Good Friday and Easter services, we nee to help them understand that the importance of Easter lies not just in the cross but in the stone as well. Create a reminder of the importance that the tomb was empty.

Sometime this weekend, give your kids a cross made of twigs and a rock from the yard. Explain that they are reminders of the two events that make Easter so important. Jesus died on the cross as a sacrifice for our sins. It represents the fact that Jesus loves us and wants us to have a relationship with Him. Jesus rose from the grave three days later. The stone represents the amazing power of a living God. It reminds us that Jesus is who He said He is, and He holds power even over death.

The cross and the stone. Two important reminders of what Easter means to us.

Linking up today with Raising Mighty Arrows.

The Truth of the Resurrection

The women rose at sunrise, gathered their supplies and walked solemnly toward the tomb. I like to imagine it was a gorgeous sunrise, but the women were most likely too miserable to notice.

All of a sudden, there was an earthquake, and a fierce-looking angel appeared. Even the Roman soldiers guarding the tomb, the most capable warriors on the face of the earth at the time, trembled in fear.

The angel spoke to the women, saying “Do not be afraid, for I know that you are looking for Jesus, who was crucified. He is not here; he has risen, just as he said. Come and see the place where he lay. Then go quickly and tell his disciples: ‘He has risen from the dead and is going ahead of you into Galilee. There you will see him.'” (Matthew 28:5-7)

I bet the women were confused. I bet they were scared. I bet they weren’t quite sure what to think. No one had ever been dead for three days and come back to life. Yet, the most amazing part was yet to come. On their way back to talk to the disciples, Jesus appeared to them. Standing in front of them was the man they had seen die on the cross, yet here He was in the flesh.

Can you imagine the joy? Can you imagine the confusion? I can only imagine that the women may have kept pinching themselves to make sure they were awake. The tomb was empty. Jesus was alive!

It’s a pretty fantastic story, isn’t it? And it’s one that can seem fantastic to our kids. With the constant blurring between reality and fiction in our world today, it can be tough for our kids to discern truth. The resurrection account honestly sounds a lot like some comic book stories or fantasy novels that my kids have read. So, how do we get our kids to focus on the truth of Easter? How do we let them know that the biblical account of the resurrection is not just another story they’ve heard, but something that really happened?

  • Treat it like it’s the truth. We’ve quit using the word “story” to refer to anything in the Bible. When we talk about “Bible stories” with our kids, we’re lumping them together with fairy tales, fiction books and things our kids make up. When you’re talking about something in the Bible refer to it as an “account” or ask your kids “What did you learn about in the Bible today?” instead of “What Bible story did you talk about?” This is a small change, but it’s one that creates a subtle distinction between the Bible and fiction.
  • Don’t be afraid to investigate it. The Bible claims to be the truth. If that’s so, then it will stand up to scrutiny. Talk with your kids about how people have come up with other explanations for the resurrection. Talk about how realistic those other explanations are and whether those explanations account for the known facts. Teach your kids how to defend what they believe by investigating the Bible. It will always hold up.
  • Offer your kids proof of the Bible’s trustworthiness. Over and over again, the Bible predicts things that will happen. And over and over again, those things have happened. The events of the Bible also didn’t happen in a vacuum. They happened in the context of history, and historical evidence backs up many of them. Point this out to your kids. Find a few specific examples, including the fact that almost all New Testament scholars — Christian and non-Christian — believe that the tomb was empty.

Our kids need to know that the Bible is true. They need to know that the account of Jesus’ death and resurrection isn’t just another tale about a guy with superhero powers. They need to know that the tomb was empty, and its emptiness is the reason for our hope. Help your kids see that the Bible is true so that the resurrection becomes real to them.

Linking up today with Women Living Well , A Wise Woman Builds Her Home and Word Filled Wednesday.

A Costco Dinner and the Last Supper

We had supper at Costco last night. Nowhere else can I feed my entire family, including dessert for $11.17. But the cheap meal isn’t the reason we ate at Costco last night. Our Costco meal came about because of my quest to protect our family dinner at all costs.

You see, on Monday nights, both girls have practice — on opposite ends of town. I have to take one girl to my husband at work, so he can take her to practice then take the other girl to practice myself. There’s no chance of us making it home for a nice family meal. What we do have time for, is a trip to Costco.

I’ve discovered that protecting that precious time at dinner is hard. Our schedules this spring make sitting down for a meal together really difficult. But I also find the effort is worth it.

I think Jesus knew the value of sitting down for a meal and fostering conversation. Think about it. Why did He tell Zaccheaus to come out of the tree? So He could go to His house for a meal. When 5,000 people were sitting in front of Him to hear His teaching, what did He do? He fed them. And on the last night of His life when He had important things to tell His disciples, what did He do? He sat down to a Passover meal with them.

Jesus used the time during the meal to let His disciples know what was coming. Matthew 26:26-29 says “While they were eating, Jesus took bread, and when he had given thanks, he broke it and gave it to his disciples, saying, ‘Take and eat; this is my body.’ Then he took a cup, and when he had given thanks, he gave it to them, saying, ‘Drink from it, all of you. This is my blood of the covenant, which is poured out for many for the forgiveness of sins. I tell you, I will not drink from this fruit of the vine from now on until that day when I drink it new with you in my Father’s kingdom.'”

We hear these words often in church when we take communion, but imagine if you had been hearing them for the first time. I’m sure the disciples were confused, wondering just what Jesus was talking about. They knew He was the Messiah, but they thought He was going to save them from their current circumstances of living under the oppression of the Roman Empire. But God had bigger plans in mind.

Just as Jesus used their dinner as a symbol of what was to come, we can use dinner to help our kids understand what that last meal meant. This week, consider having a traditional Seder supper, which is what the disciples and Jesus ate. Each piece of the meal has a symbolic meaning that reminds us of God’s great plan for redemption.

Here’s some simple directions for what to serve and what each food means.

Unleavened bread — This was a reminder to the Jews that God had brought them out of Egypt. They didn’t have time for the bread to rise when they were leaving, so this is what they carried. It’s also a reminder to us that Jesus sacrificed His body on the cross.

Lamb — The Passover lamb was killed and the blood spread across the doorposts so the angel of death would pass over those homes during the last plague in Egypt. Jesus is the sacrificial lamb for our sins.

Horseradish — This bitter herb reminded the Jews of the bitterness they felt when they were enslaved in Egypt. Use it to remind your kids of the bitterness of sin.

Haroset — Haroset is crushed apples, nuts and honey blended together. It represents hope. Jesus brought hope into the world.

Salt water and parsley — Dip the parsley into the salt water as a reminder of the tears the Israelites shed in Egypt. The salt water also reminds us of the sorrow of Jesus’ death, but parsley is the symbol of new life represented by Jesus’ resurrection.

Grape juice — Grape juice is the symbol of Jesus’ blood, which washes away our sins.

Find a night this week to introduce your kids to the symbolism in the Passover meal. It will make the meal Jesus shared with His disciples more real to them, and it will generate lots of conversation about Easter. This isn’t a hard meal to put together, and it will be an experience your kids will remember.

If you want to know more about Passover, check out Hebrew4Christians and this great post at Chrysalis.

Linking up today with Time-Warp Wife, Growing Home, and A Pause on the Path.